Argyll & Sutherland Regimental Sterling Silver Sgian Dubh

£450.00

Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders officers sgian dubh

In hallmarked sterling silver with stone set hilt. Hand made by the regimental silversmith and hallmarked Edinburgh. As worn by the officers of the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

Made to order. Hand made to order approx 3-4 weeks.

Please email if you require for a certain date to check time from order.

The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise’s) was a line infantry regiment of the British Army that existed from 1881 until amalgamation into the Royal Regiment of Scotland in March 2006.

The regiment was created under the Childers Reforms in 1881, as the Princess Louise’s (Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders), by the amalgamation of the 91st (Argyllshire Highlanders) Regiment of Foot and 93rd (Sutherland Highlanders) Regiment of Foot, amended the following year to reverse the order of the “Argyll” and “Sutherland” sub-titles.

Our range of fine hallmarked sterling silver skean dubh’s and dirks made by the Regimental silversmith and Royal silversmiths Hamilton & Inches in Edinburgh and our regimental silversmith in Scotland.  We can engrave many of these skean dubhs for presentation gifts.  Many of these skean dubhs complement the silver buckles, kilt pins and Scottish silver buttons we have available from our highland jewellery page.

Description

Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders officers sgian dubh

In hallmarked sterling silver with stone set hilt. Hand made by the regimental silversmith and hallmarked Edinburgh. As worn by the officers of the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

Made to order. Hand made to order. Please email if you require for a certain date to check time from order.

The Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders – In 1793 King George III requested the 5th Duke of Argyll to raise a kilted regiment of 1,100 men, which became the 98th Argyllshire Highlanders as part of the British Army on 9 July 1794 (re-numbered to the 91st Argyllshire Highlanders in 1798). In 1795 the regiment embarked to South Africa to capture the Cape of Good Hope from the Dutch, returning to England in 1803 to help patrol the southern counties against the possibility of an invasion by Napoleon. In 1808 the regiment was deployed to Portugal as a rearguard action against Napoleon’s army; and in 1812 was part of the advance which pushed the French out of Spain. 1814 saw service in New Orleans followed by deployment to the West Indies, Canada and Crimea. Later it also served in St Helena, India and South Africa. In 1881 it became the 1st Battalion Princess Louise’s Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Between 1881 and 1914 the regiment served in South Africa, Ceylon and Hong Kong before taking part in the Boer War between 1899 and 1902, and thereafter in Malta, India and South Africa. Following the outbreak of World War I the regiment served in France, Flanders and the Mediterranean. Between 1919 and 1939 there was service in Turkey, Jamaica, Hong Kong, China, India, Egypt and Sudan. World War II saw service in Palestine, North Africa, Crete, Ethiopia, Sicily, Italy, Malaya, France and Belgium.

Post 1945 saw service in Palestine and the Korean War and then in British Guiana, Berlin and Egypt, Cyprus and the Rhine. In 1964 the regiment moved to Singapore and then Borneo and Aden. The regiment was stationed at Canterbury in Kent as part of 16 Air Assault Brigade, Britain’s primary Rapid Reaction Force; and it subsequently saw service in Afghanistan.

The strength of the Pipes and Drums of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders has varied in numbers throughout the years; and whenever the regiment was stationed in the UK the Pipe Band has been permitted to play in the relevant grade in national Pipe Band competitions. The training of Cruachan, the regimental pony mascot, is undertaken to prepare the mascot to participate in parades with the Pipes and Drums, including the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo.

Since 2006 the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders have been known as 5 SCOTS The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders as part of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Our range of fine hallmarked sterling silver skean dubh’s and dirks made by the Regimental silversmith and Royal silversmiths Hamilton & Inches in Edinburgh and our regimental silversmith in Scotland.  We can engrave many of these skean dubhs for presentation gifts.  Many of these skean dubhs complement the silver buckles, kilt pins and Scottish silver buttons we have available from our highland jewellery page.

The Gaelic sgian dubh meaning “black knife”, where “black” may refer to the usual colour of the handle of the knife. It is also suggested that “black” means secret, or hidden, as in the word blackmail. This is based on the stories and theories surrounding the knife’s origin and the meaning of “Dubh” in Gaelic, in particular those associated with the Highland custom of depositing weapons at the entrance to a house prior to entering as a guest. Despite this practice, a small twin edged-dagger, (‘Mattucashlass’), concealed under the armpit, combined with a smaller knife, (‘Sgian dubh’).