Atholl Highlanders Silver Regimental Sgian Dubh

£450.00

Atholl Highlanders Silver Regimental Sgian Dubh

Hand made by the regimental silversmith, with solid silver mounts and ‘ Wild man of Atholl ” badge mounted on a hand carved hilt. Classic pin top, top mount

Made to order approx 4 weeks

The Atholl Highlanders is a Scottish ceremonial infantry regiment. The regiment is not part of the British Army but under the command of the Duke of Atholl, and based in Blair Atholl.

Made to order approx 4 weeks

The Atholl Highlanders is a Scottish ceremonial infantry regiment. The regiment is not part of the British Army but under the command of the Duke of Atholl, and based in Blair Atholl.

The regiment was raised in Perthshire by John Murray, 4th Duke of Atholl as the 77th Regiment of Foot (or Atholl Highlanders, or Murray’s Highlanders) in December 1777. The regiment was formed as a relief for other regiments serving in North America, and spent most of its existence in Ireland.

More than 50 years later, in 1839, George Murray, 6th Duke of Atholl, as Lord Glenlyon, re formed the regimentas a bodyguard which he took to the Eglinton Tournament at Eglinton Castle, Ayrshire. Three years later, in 1842, the regiment escorted Queen Victoria during her tour of Perthshire and, in 1844, when the Queen stayed as a guest of the Duke at Blair Castle, the regiment mounted the guard for the entire duration of her stay. In recognition of the service that the regiment provided during her two visits, the Queen announced that she would present the Atholl Highlanders with colours, thus giving the regiment official status. The regiment’s first stand of colours was presented by Lady Glenlyon on behalf of the Queen in 1845.

Our range of fine hallmarked sterling silver skean dubh’s and dirks made by the Regimental silversmith and Royal silversmiths Hamilton & Inches in Edinburgh and our regimental silversmith in Scotland.  We can engrave many of these skean dubhs for presentation gifts.  Many of these skean dubhs complement the silver buckles, kilt pins and Scottish silver buttons we have available from our highland jewellery page.

Description

Atholl Highlanders Silver Regimental Sgian Dubh

Hand made by the regimental silversmith, with solid silver mounts and ‘ Wild man of Atholl ” badge mounted on a hand carved hilt. Classic pin top, top mount

Made to order approx 4 weeks

The Atholl Highlanders is a Scottish ceremonial infantry regiment. The regiment is not part of the British Army but under the command of the Duke of Atholl, and based in Blair Atholl.

The regiment was raised in Perthshire by John Murray, 4th Duke of Atholl as the 77th Regiment of Foot (or Atholl Highlanders, or Murray’s Highlanders) in December 1777. The regiment was formed as a relief for other regiments serving in North America, and spent most of its existence in Ireland.

More than 50 years later, in 1839, George Murray, 6th Duke of Atholl, as Lord Glenlyon, re formed the regimentas a bodyguard which he took to the Eglinton Tournament at Eglinton Castle, Ayrshire. Three years later, in 1842, the regiment escorted Queen Victoria during her tour of Perthshire and, in 1844, when the Queen stayed as a guest of the Duke at Blair Castle, the regiment mounted the guard for the entire duration of her stay. In recognition of the service that the regiment provided during her two visits, the Queen announced that she would present the Atholl Highlanders with colours, thus giving the regiment official status. The regiment’s first stand of colours was presented by Lady Glenlyon on behalf of the Queen in 1845.

 

Our range of fine hallmarked sterling silver skean dubh’s and dirks made by the Regimental silversmith and Royal silversmiths Hamilton & Inches in Edinburgh and our regimental silversmith in Scotland.  We can engrave many of these skean dubhs for presentation gifts.  Many of these skean dubhs complement the silver buckles, kilt pins and Scottish silver buttons we have available from our highland jewellery page.

The Gaelic sgian dubh meaning “black knife”, where “black” may refer to the usual colour of the handle of the knife. It is also suggested that “black” means secret, or hidden, as in the word blackmail. This is based on the stories and theories surrounding the knife’s origin and the meaning of “Dubh” in Gaelic, in particular those associated with the Highland custom of depositing weapons at the entrance to a house prior to entering as a guest. Despite this practice, a small twin edged-dagger, (‘Mattucashlass’), concealed under the armpit, combined with a smaller knife, (‘Sgian dubh’).